Consequentialism and Robust Goods

Publikationsår: 2019

Andric, Vuko

Utilitas, 1–9, doi:10.1017/S0953820819000116

Sammanfattning

In this article, I critique the moral theory developed in Philip Pettit’s The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect (2015). Pettit’s theory, which I label Robust-Goods Consequentialism, aims to avoid the problems but retain the attractive features of traditional consequentialist theories. The distinctive feature of Robust-Goods Consequentialism is a value theory that attempts to accommodate what Pettit calls rich goods: certain moral phenomena that can be categorized under the headings of attachment,
virtue and respect. I argue that Robust-Goods Consequentialism fails because it implies very implausible value judgements.

Läs mer om artikeln: Consequentialism and Robust Goods

Publikationsår: 2019

Andric, Vuko ,

Utilitas, 1–9, doi:10.1017/S0953820819000116

Sammanfattning

In this article, I critique the moral theory developed in Philip Pettit’s The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect (2015). Pettit’s theory, which I label Robust-Goods Consequentialism, aims to avoid the problems but retain the attractive features of traditional consequentialist theories. The distinctive feature of Robust-Goods Consequentialism is a value theory that attempts to accommodate what Pettit calls rich goods: certain moral phenomena that can be categorized under the headings of attachment,
virtue and respect. I argue that Robust-Goods Consequentialism fails because it implies very implausible value judgements.

Läs mer om artikeln: Consequentialism and Robust Goods